Rachael Yamagata

Updated 12/6/2012

Monday: Bright Eyes and Dan Wilson collaborator brings throaty blues-pop to the Varsity.

Rachael Yamagata

RACHAEL YAMAGATA

8 p.m. • Varsity Theater • 18-plus • $16-$18

When turnover at Warner Bros. stranded this bluesy soft-rocker on an indifferent label, the Arlington, Va., singer-songwriter went the fan-funding route and released last year's "Chesapeake" via her own Frankenfish Records. While imprint naming clearly isn't her thing, the Bright Eyes and Dan Wilson collaborator can throatily tear through piano-laced, blues-pop tunes with Cities 97's "Sampler" sizzle. The husky-voiced songstress is touring on her new "Heavyweight" EP, out this week. Ed Romanoff opens.MICHAEL RIETMULDER

TURBO FRUITS

10 p.m. • Turf Club • $8

Unhappy during his band's brief stint on Fat Possum, Turbo Fruits frontman Jonas Stein had some choice words for the hip indie label (hint: it involved fellatio). So, for album No. 3 the Nashville garage rockers kept it local, releasing September's "Butter" with King of Leon's Serpents and Snakes Records. While their sex may not be on fire (freakin' KOL), the quartet's surfier, quasi-countrified kickers are predictably sweaty and '50s-invoking rock 'n' roll ballads serve as sneering pillow talk. Punky and bluesy locals the Goondas open. M.R.

LEO KOTTKE

7:30 p.m. • Guthrie Theater • $38-$43

What better way to recover from Thanksgiving than an evening with two brilliant and hilariously twisted musicians? Yes, it's Leo Kottke's 430th annual post-turkey concert in his hometown. That means an evening of guitar splendor, quirky humor and deep-gulch vocals. Opening is the delightful Nellie McKay, a New York pianist/ukulele player who mashes up many styles (from Broadway to hip-hop) with sharp, politicized and sometimes corny humor.JON BREAM

KARRIN ALLYSON

7 & 9 p.m. Mon.-Tue. • Dakota Jazz Club • $25-$40

Former Twin Cities resident and frequent Grammy nominee Allyson is back for a two-night stand, to perform songs from her impressive 13-album catalog on the Concord Jazz label. It's rare that an artist and a record company stay together so long in the modern music marketplace. Heck, it was rare enough in the boom years of the 1960s and 1970s. Allyson's obviously been doing quite a bit right, surrounding herself with top musicians and making each trip to the studio memorable. TOM SUROWICZ